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How To Spot a Dishonest Contractor

Watch more Home Repair & DIY videos: www.howcast.com Subscribe to Howcast’s YouTube Channel – howc.st Learn how to spot a dishonest contractor by recognizing these red flags. Howcast uploads the highest quality how-to videos daily! Be sure to check out our playlists for guides that interest you: howc.st Subscribe to Howcast’s other YouTube Channels: Howcast Health Channel – howc.st Howcast Video Games Channel – howc.st Howcast Tech Channel – howc.st Howcast Food Channel – howc.st Howcast Arts & Recreation Channel – howc.st Howcast Sports & Fitness Channel – howc.st Howcast Personal Care & Style Channel – howc.st Howcast empowers people with engaging, useful how-to information wherever, whenever they need to know how. Emphasizing high-quality instructional videos, Howcast brings you experts who provide accurate information in easy-to-follow tutorials on everything from makeup, hairstyling, nail art design, and soccer to parkour, skateboarding, dancing, kissing, and much, much more. Step 1: Make the first move If a contractor comes to you unsolicited looking for business, he may not be reputable. Ignore the contractor who comes knocking on your door with an offer and go find someone on your own. Step 2: Ask a test question Test him with a question you already know the answer to. For example, if there’s a crack in your wall, say something like, ‘I hope I don’t need to re-sheetrock the entire room!’ If he responds, ‘You very well might,’ he’s probably trying to scam you. Tip
Video Rating: 5 / 5

The Great Gildersleeve: A Job Contact / The New Water Commissioner / Election Day Bet

The Great Gildersleeve (1941–1957), initially written by Leonard Lewis Levinson, was one of broadcast history’s earliest spin-off programs. Built around Throckmorton Philharmonic Gildersleeve, a character who had been a staple on the classic radio situation comedy Fibber McGee and Molly, first introduced on Oct. 3, 1939, ep. #216. The Great Gildersleeve enjoyed its greatest success in the 1940s. Actor Harold Peary played the character during its transition from the parent show into the spin-off and later in a quartet of feature films released at the height of the show’s popularity. On Fibber McGee and Molly, Peary’s Gildersleeve was a pompous windbag who became a consistent McGee nemesis. “You’re a haa-aa-aa-aard man, McGee!” became a Gildersleeve catchphrase. The character was given several conflicting first names on Fibber McGee and Molly, and on one episode his middle name was revealed as Philharmonic. Gildy admits as much at the end of “Gildersleeve’s Diary” on the Fibber McGee and Molly series (Oct. 22, 1940). He soon became so popular that Kraft Foods—looking primarily to promote its Parkay margarine spread — sponsored a new series with Peary’s Gildersleeve as the central, slightly softened and slightly befuddled focus of a lively new family. Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees’ Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law’s estate and took on the rearing of his
Video Rating: 2 / 5

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